Emily’s third book ‘Meditation Mind’ has just been published, a collection of poems inspired by her Buddhist meditation practice.  Written at a time when she was unable to play her instruments due to chronic tennis elbow, poetry was Emily’s creative outlet while she struggled with a deep, bipolar depression.  Desperate to do something creative while she couldn’t write or play songs, every morning after meditating she would write a poem in her journal.  These short, stream-of-consciousness poems form the basis of this collection.

The poems in ‘Meditation Mind’ are about life, the dharma (Buddha’s teachings) and our search for happiness.  Emily has practised Tibetan Buddhism for many years under the guidance of her teacher, the internationally renowned Buddhist scholar Lama Jampa Thaye.

‘Meditation Mind’ is available to order from all good bookshops, from Amazon or through her website.  To celebrate its publication, Emily is doing a book tour in the UK later this year.  Dates and details will be announced soon.

Emily’s visit to perform at Callington Road mental health hospital in Bristol on 5 July provoked a wonderful response from staff and patients:

“Many thanks for coming to Callington Road, Emily and performing for pretty much the entire duration of the tea party. You truly went above and beyond – especially in the ridiculous heat. I would like to thank you particularly for going on to the female PICU ward. For half an hour you completely changed the atmosphere in a truly bleak place. Your music and interaction with the patients inspired some incredibly traumatised and unwell women to step back into the present and remember that there is still hope. It was very appreciated by the staff and patients alike. You left a warm glow on that ward. Any chance you could make time to do a weekly acoustic set and song writing workshop there?! Only joking, many, many thanks.”  Alex Hiding (OT department) and all the staff on ECH and at Callington Road.

Read Emily’s blog about her visit to Callington Road and find out more about her work promoting music for mental health.

Emily performed at the annual Co-Production Festival in London, part of Co-Production Week organised by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE).  She sang her songs about surviving mental illness and was applauded by the audience for her speech about the benefits of music for mental health.

“Listening to  was a real treat.  Completely emotive music from this wonderful mental health advocate.” [Care Quality Commission).

To find out more about Emily’s work in mental health, including her hospital gigs, click here.

Emily is performing at the annual Co-Production Festival in London next week alongside Britain’s Got Talent winner Lost Voice Guy (aka Lee Ridley), as featured in The Guardian.  Organised by the Social Care Institute for Excellence, the festival is part of the third Co-production Week celebrating the benefits of co-production, sharing good practice and highlighting the contribution of people who use services and carers to developing better social care and health public services.